Using Product-Service Systems to Enhance Sustainable...

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Product-service systems (PSS) are an innovative business approach that shifts the traditional business focus from selling physical products only (e.g. a washing machine) to selling a mix of products and services (e.g. cleaning services) that are jointly capable of meeting specific client demand (clean clothes). The key idea behind PSS is that consumers do not demand products per se, but are seeking the utility provided by products and services. One value-added of PSS lies in their potential to decouple consumption from economic growth, as they offer the possibility of meeting more needs with lower material and energy requirements. This technical report examines the nexus between product-service systems and sustainable public procurement, drawing together international experience. The aim of this report is, in particular, to demonstrate how product-service systems can be used by governments in the context of sustainable public procurement (SPP) policies and initiatives, thus contributing to a more resource-efficient, low-carbon and inclusive green economy. Some examples of the use of product-service systems by government organizations are given in the case studies in Annex I. This technical report was produced by working group 3A of the 10YFP SPP Programme.
Sustainable Public Procurement Sustainable Public Procurement

The Business Case for Eco-Innovation

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This publication sets out to demonstrate the compelling business case for eco-innovation and how it can enable your company to carve out commercially interesting opportunities. You are presented with examples from companies that have integrated eco-innovation at the core of their business strategy. The findings demonstrate considerable business benefits including: increased market access, value creation and business growth (with an average annual growth of 15 % from eco-innovative companies) along with increased operational resilience. As a result of eco-innovation, these companies are developing new solutions and products1 which can perform above industry standards. With global resource scarcity and environmental degradation presenting growing challenges for business, along with related market and regulatory pressures, companies are facing a need to think more strategically about the sustainability of their business. Eco-innovation can help transform these challenges into new market opportunities.
Sustainable Public Procurement Sustainable Public Procurement

Sustainability of Supply Chains and Sustainable Public...

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Sustainable public procurement often draws upon a worldwide market – globalization in the business sector has resulted in dramatic growth in the cross- border movement of commodities and goods. As a result, we now see an increase in the complexity of supply chains, with products imported from a variety of countries where different social and economic regulatory frameworks prevail. In order to become more sustainable, public procurement thus has to deal with an increasing number of environmental, social or ethical issues at all stages of the supply chain.. This pre-study assesses state of the art regarding sustainable supply chain management and how it relates to public procurement by zeroing in on two product groups – timber and textiles.
Sustainable Public Procurement Sustainable Public Procurement

SCP Targets and Indicators and the SDGs

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Based on the review of official documents, reports, and United Nations processes, through an extensive methodology that is detailed in the Annex of the present paper, the following SCP targets and indicators have been identified as being among the most important for inclusion in the SDGs. Whether these targets and indicators are included under a stand-alone SCP goal, or are integrated under other issue-specific goals, it appears crucial that the issue of sustainable consumption and production be placed at the core of the next global development agenda. To assist member states and other stakeholders in considering these possible targets and indicators, they have been grouped under some of the focus areas defined by the OWG on SDGs, as reflected in the draft of 17 April 2014, prepared by the co-chairs. A matrix summarizing them appears immediately below, and the rationale for proposing them is explored in more depth in the main body of the present paper.
Sustainable Public Procurement Sustainable Public Procurement